How To Hit Your Golf Ball Straight And Far: Do Not Rely On Wrist Action Alone

straight golf shotWhen learning how to hit your golf ball straight and far, beware of just relying on your wrist action.

Usually, when learning how to hit your golf ball straight and far you will come up short with wrist action alone.

In order to maximize distance, as well as accuracy, you must rely on a combination of power sources, including an hinging of the wrists during the back swing and, an unhinging your wrists during your downswing.

A more significant source of power is the extent of your shoulder turn.

Even if you delay unhinging your wrists during the impact zone of your downswing but do not turn your shoulders fully during your back swing, you will lose significant distance in your golf shot.

You may also lose accuracy because of a lack of synchronization between your shoulder turn and your wrists action.

Another power source is your hip rotation. This is somewhat controlled by your shoulder turn, however.

Assuming that you have established a square alignment and an on plane swing path of your club face at the  final address to your ball, if you keep your left heel planted, keep your left arm relatively  straight, turn your shoulders and hips until your left shoulder firmly touches your chin and maintain eye contact with your ball from the beginning of your swing through impact, you will experience how to hit your golf  ball straight and far.

The challenge is to establish a square alignment and an on plane swing path of your club face at the completion of your setup routine.

The most reliable way to do this is to lock-in a square alignment and an on plane swing path of your club face at final address by using the techniques available at http://lockedingolf.com.

If you like this article, kindly click the “likes” button.

Copyright © 2013 by Gordon Jackson…all rights reserved

 

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.