Perfect Your Golf Swing: Determine Whether You Have Created A Square Alignment Of Your Club Face

golf swing tipsYou can help perfect your golf swing by knowing how to determine whether you have established a square alignment and an on line swing path of your clubface.

When you hinge your wrists after gripping your club with either an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip, the direction in which your club shaft points will indicate whether you have an out-to-in swing path of your clubface, an in-to-out swing path of your clubface or an on line swing path of your clubface.

When you have an on line swing path of your clubface, you correspondingly will have square clubface alignment. Likewise, when you have a square clubface alignment of your clubface you correspondingly will have an on line swing path.

This is one of the most phenomenal golf swing basics.

If you want to hit a golf ball straight, your clubface must contact your ball squarely on a swing path that matches your shoulder line.

After gripping your club with either an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip and then hinging your wrist, if your club shaft is aligned perpendicularly to the tip-end of your right shoulder, it will indicate you have a square alignment and an on line swing path of your club face.

This golf swing tip applies at any point of your setup proceedings or during your back swing when you hinge your wrists after gripping your hands on a golf club.

For example, if you observe the position of the club shaft of many of the tour players at the completion of their backswings you will notice their club shaft typically points to or hovers directly over the tip end of their right shoulder.

This indicates a square alignment and an online swing path of the clubface at this point of their golf swing.

If the golfer were to then swing the golf club downward to the ball from this position without manipulating the clubface in the process, the downswing would deliver a square clubface to the ball at impact on a swing path that parallels the shoulder line and produce straight golf shots.

The same proposition applies to you.

If your club shaft points directly to or hovers directly over the tip end of your right shoulder at the completion of your back swing, it would   indicate a square alignment and an on line swing path of your clubface at sucht point of your golf swing.

On the other hand, if your club shaft points to the outside of the tip end of your right shoulder at the completion of your backswing it would indicate an out-to-in swing path of your clubface.

Depending on whether you have an open or closed clubface alignment at such point, a non-manipulative downswing would produce either a slice or pull golf shot.

If your club shaft points to the inside of your of the tip-end of your right shoulder at the completions of your backswing, it would indicate an in-to-out swing path of your clubface.

Depending on whether have an open or closed clubface alignment at such point, a non-manipulative downswing would produce either a hook or push golf shot.

I truly am amazed why golf instructors do not observe the position of the club shaft of their students at the completion of their back swings to determine whether they have an out-to-in, in-to-out or on line swing path of their clubface.

Without such knowledge it is difficult to teach a student how to correct any defects in their golf swings.

With such knowledge, you can improve your golf game substantially.

Irrespective of what golf teachers know or do know about this phenomenon, you should now know how to determine whether you have an on line swing path and a square alignment of your clubface by simple observing the position of your club shaft at the completion of your back swing.

Once you understand this phenomenon, you should be on your way to perfect your golf swing.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson—all rights reserved.       hit a golf ball straight

 

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.