How To Hit A Golf Ball Straight: The Locked-In Way

How to Hit a Golf Ball StraightOne of the best ways to learn how to hit a golf ball straight is to perform the locked-in method.

When learning how to hit a golf ball straight by performing this method, there are several matters to keep in mind.

First, you should know how the locked-in techniques originated.

After many years of attempting to hit a golf ball straight without much success, I decided to determine why a given golf shot will fly in one direction in one instance and fly in the opposite direction in another, while swinging the club the very same way each time.

I wanted to learn how to fix a slice which was my primary shot shape.

Not only did I suffer this dilemma but I observed other golfers suffering this effect as well, even professional golfers.

It is most difficult to play golf successfully unless you know in which direction and pattern your ball will fly.

So I began to experiment in an attempt to unlock the mystery of golf. I wanted a better golf method.

I particularly concentrated on how the hands are placed on the club because I sensed that the conventional styles of grip, whether an overlapping, interlocking or baseball type of grip, could be the cause of why I could not hit straight golf shots in a consistent manner.

What I learned is that a square alignment of the club face does not exist when the hands are formed on the club handle in a conventional manner because the left hand is placed on the club in a diagonal manner.

This is true irrespective of how many knuckles you can detect on your left hand from your line of vision at the completion of the grip. This likewise is a reality regardless of how the “v’s” (formed between the thumb and index finger of each hand) point at the completion of your grip.

It doesn’t matter whether the clubface appears to be aligned squarely when the grip is completed.  The diagonal manner in which the left hand is gripped on a club prevents a truly square alignment of the clubface from being formed.

What I discovered instead, however, was the instant you form your hands on a club, whether with an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip, the club face will rotate to an effective open alignment. In addition, the clubface will rotate to an effective out-to-in swing path the instant any of the three conventional styles of grip are formed on a club.

Considering the clubface will rotate to an effective open alignment and an out-to-in swing path the instant a conventional type of grip is formed on a club, a slice ball flight alignment correspondingly is created.

Obviously, you are not going to hit straight golf shots with a slice ball flight alignment created during your set up routine unless you manipulate the club in a perfect manner during the golf swing to deliver a square clubface to the ball at impact.

The chances of most recreational and weekend golfers producing straight golf shots by manipulating the club in a such a precise manner is not very favorable.

After discovering the phenomenon that an effective slice ball flight alignment exists the very instant you assume a conventional style of grip on a golf club, I then discovered why a golfer will slice the ball in one instance and hook it in the next, while swinging the club the same way each time.

I also discovered why it is so difficult to learn how to drive your golf ball straight.

Here is why.

The slice ball flight alignment that is created the instant you grip a club in a conventional way is not locked-in. As a result any body movement, such as widening or narrowing the stance, raising or lowering the shoulders, moving nearer to or farther from the ball, flexing the knees up or down, etc., will cause the inherent slice alignment to change to a different alignment.

In turn, each subsequent body movement thereafter will continue to rotate the alignment and path of the club to yet another different ball flight alignment.

Considering the  reality that most golfers move various body parts after initially gripping the club, the alignment and path of the clubface could rotate to any of the seven possible ball flight alignments, including a hook, push, pull, push-slice, pull-hook, a more severe slice or to even a straight ball flight alignment, at the completion of the set up proceedings.

However, considering the alignment and path of the clubface will rotate to straight ball flight position only during a very narrow rotational band width, the odds of the clubface rotating to a straight ball flight alignment in such an instance is rather slim to none.

Therefore, since a golfer has no way of knowing whether the clubface has rotated to a specific ball flight alignment as a result of various body movements once the grip is completed, the clubface could be rotated to produce a slice in one instance and a hook in the next, while swinging the club precisely the same way each time.

Now you know the answer to this age-old question that has frustrated golfers from the inception of the sport.

However, since discovering that a slice ball flight alignment will be created the instance a conventional style of grip is formed on a club and that the alignment and path of the clubface will rotate it to a different ball flight position with each body movement thereafter, I have been able to design, develop and perfect more than 100 techniques to convert the inherent slice alignment to a straight ball flight alignment and then lock-in such an alignment so that the same precise swing will produce an identical  ball flight each time.

When you learn how to perform any of these techniques that are available in books, DVDs, Special Reports and articles at www.lockedingolf.com, you too will know how to hit a golf ball straight each and every time you desire.

Copyright © 2012 by Gordon Jackson –all rights reservedfix a slice

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.