GOLF SWING INSTRUCTIONS: ENSURE ACCURACY WHEN STEPPING OFF YARDAGE

golf swing instructionsBeing accurate when stepping off yardages is some of the best golf swing instructions you will ever receive..

The .reason why this is some of the best golf swing instructions you will ever receive is you must know the precise yardage to your target in order to select the correct club and execute the perfect golf swing.

Many golfers assume each step they take is equal to one yard of measurement. This is not a good golf method of determining true yardage.

For instance, they assume 100 steps equates to 100 yards.

The truth be known, when a typical golfer steps off 100 paces, it equates nearer to 80 than to 100 yards, unless he or she has a very long stride.

Unless the typical golfer really stretches his or her stride when stepping off yardage, the number of paces will be considerable more than the actual yardage.

For example, at my age and condition (well past an invitation to join AARP), I hit my lob wedge approximately 80 yards at sea level.

However, when I step off the distance of my lob wedge, it is more   like 100 paces instead of the actual 80 yards.

If I assumed the yardage was 100 instead of the actual 80 and hit my gap wedge instead of my lob wedge, my ball most likely would fly over the green.

Similarly, my full wedge shots at sea level during the summer months average approximately 110 yards. However when I step off the distance of my full wedge shots it approximates 135 steps instead of 110.

If I assumed the yardage was 135 instead of the actual 110 and, as a result, hit my 8 iron instead of my wedge, I would be well past the cup and most likely well over the green.

I realize many golfers no longer step off their yardages but, instead, rely on range finders to determine the yardage to their target.

However, there are some courses that are not adaptable or friendly to range finders and golfers who play such courses must rely on yardage markers as well as step off the yardage to their target when not in close proximity to a yardage marker.

In addition, even when a course is adaptable to range finders, some local rules during tournaments, etc, do not permit their usage and again, you must rely on yardage markers and step off yardages when not in close proximity of such yardage markers.

In such instances, you need to know the precise number of paces for the yardage between your ball and your target in order to select the correct club for the respective golf shot and, then hit your best golf shots.

One of the best golf techniques to calculate the number of paces for the actual yardage of each club on full shots  is to play a few practice rounds on a par three course that has an abundance of holes ranging from 70 up to 200 yards between the tee markers and the middle of the greens.

Then merely count the paces from the yardage marker at the tee box to the middle of the green on different holes to determine the paces needed for specific yardages. Next, make a mental note of what you have observed or, better yet, record such information on a pocket pad.

You then should know the number of paces for each of your scoring clubs for full golf shots.

Once you know and have recorded the precise number of steps for each of the scoring clubs in your set, you should agree the above information has to be some of the best golf swing instructions anywhere.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson—All Rights Reserved   how to hit a golf ball straight with a driver

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.