IMPROVE YOUR GOLF SWING: YOUR ELBOW LINE DETERMINES YOUR SWING PATH

improve your golf swingOne of the first things you should understand about golf mechanics in order to improve your golf swing significantly is that the relationship between your elbow line and your shoulder line will determine the swing path of your club face.

Learn this fundamental of golf mechanics and it improve your golf swing.

It will determine the swing path of your club face.

How the swing path of your club face is aligned at impact will determine whether you curve the flight of the ball in some way or hit the golf ball straight.

All too many conventional golf instructors and commentators, as well as golfers, mistakenly believe it is the relationship between the shoulder line and the target line that determines the swing path of the club face.

In reality, the body has no physical relationship to the target line.

The target line could be at right angles to the shoulder line and the body would have no clue as to such an alignment.

However, the body definitely has a physical relationship with the   elbows and shoulders.

If you are confused at this point, you should appreciate the fact that the elbow line is the imaginary line that runs across the elbows. Conceptually, I like to think of the elbow line as the imaginary line running across the inside creases of the elbows.

On the other hand, the shoulder line is the imaginary line running across the shoulders.

When your elbow line is pointing to the inside of your shoulder line, an out-to-in swing path of your club face will be created.

Nonetheless, unless your elbows are locked-in in such a manner, the relationship between your elbow line and shoulder line will change in response to almost any body movement after your hands are gripped on the club.

When your elbow line is pointing to the outside of your shoulder line, an in-to-out swing path of your club face will be created.

Once again, if your elbow line is not locked-in in such a manner, almost any subsequent body movement will change the relationship between the shoulder line and the elbow line after gripping the club.

When your elbow line is aligned parallel with your shoulder line an on line swing path of your club face will be created.

Nevertheless, unless such elbow line is locked-in, any subsequent body movement will change the alignment between the elbows and the shoulders.

If the elbow line is locked-in to the inside of the shoulder line, an out-to-in swing path of the club face correspondingly will be locked-in.

If an open club face contacts the ball on an out-to-in swing path in relation to the shoulders, a fade or slice ball flight will result,

If a closed club face contacts the ball on an out-to-in swing path of the club face in relation to the shoulders, a pull ball flight alignment will result.

If an extremely closed club face contacts the ball on a pronounced out-to-in swing path in relation to the shoulders, a pull-hook ball flight will result.

If the elbow line is locked-in to the outside of the shoulder line, an in-to-out swing path of the club face correspondingly will be locked-in

If a closed club face contacts the ball on an in-to-out swing path in relation to the shoulders, a draw or hook ball flight will result.

If an open club face contacts the ball on an in-to-out swing path in relation to the shoulders, a push ball flight will result.

If an extremely open club face contacts the ball on a pronounced in-to-out swing path in relation to the shoulders, a push-slice ball flight will result.

If you learn how to lock-in different ball flight alignments during your setup routine, you definitely will improve your golf swing.

You can find out more information about how to lock-in specific ball flight alignments at http://lockedingolf.com.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson –all right reserved.

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.