FIX A SLICE: HOW TO CURE A SLICE FOR GOOD

fix a sliceHardly a day goes by unless you see someone on the Golf Channel or read an article in a golfing magazine about some new tip or technique to fix a slice.

Unfortunately, none of these so-called techniques to fix a slice do the job because they do not address the underlying cause of a slice.

That is to say, none of these so-called slice fixes address the reason why golfers slice. Neither do they provide any meaningful remedy to eliminate a slice golf shot or instruct how to hit a golf ball straight.

Here is the reason or cause of a slice.

Unbeknownst to instructors and golfers alike, a slice ball flight alignment is created the instant a golf club is gripped with an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip.

Probably more than more 99 percent of golfers prefer either the original Vardon overlapping, Vardon modified overlapping, the traditional interlocking or regular baseball (ten fingers) style of grip.

The instant the hands are formed on a golf club with any of these conventional styles of grip, the wrists will rotate the clubface to an   open alignment.

In addition, the instant the hands are formed on a golf club with any of theses conventional styles of grip, the elbows (elbow line) will rotate to the inside of the shoulders (shoulder line) to create an out-to-in swing path of the clubface.

The combination of an open clubface and an out-to-in swing path of the clubface will establish a slice ball flight alignment.

Thus, you will create a slice ball flight alignment the instant you grip your club with one of these conventional styles of grip.

This is the primary reason why a vast majority of golfers slice their ball.

They simply center their clubface directly behind their ball, assume either an overlapping, interlocking or baseball style of grip and execute their golf swing.

If the impact position of their clubface is the same as at the address position, the clubface will contact the ball with an open alignment on an out-to-in swing path and the ball will curve in a classic slice pattern.

What’s worse, however, is the fact that if there is any body movement after forming a conventional style of grip on a golf club, such as raising or lowering the shoulders, arching, bowing or rotating the wrists, moving nearer or farther from the ball, etc., the wrists will rotate the clubface to a different and unknown alignment and the elbows will rotate the clubface to a different and unknown swing path.

What’s worse than worse is that if there is subsequent body movement after any initial body movement following a conventional style of grip on the club, the wrists once again will rotate the clubface to yet another different alignment and the elbows will once again rotate the clubface to another different swing path, all unknown to the golfer.

What is even worse than worse is the fact if the clubface is then swung to the inside or to the outside of its pre-swing path, the wrists and elbows will again rotate the clubface to yet another different alignment and swing path, all unknown to the golfer.

In such an instance, it is anyone’s guess as to what alignment and swing path will exist when the clubface contacts the ball at impact.

Because of such multiple body movements between the time the club is gripped and the point of impact, a golfer my slice the ball in one instance and hook it in the next while swinging the club on the same exact manner, without ever knowing why.

So how do you stop this golfing insanity and fix a slice or any other such errant alignment?

The answer is you must rotate the clubface to a square alignment (which automatically will rotate the clubface to an on line swing path), by moving some body part either between the time the left hand and the right hand is gripped on the club or, immediately after the club is gripped and, then lock in such a square alignment and on line swing path of the clubface during the setup proceedings.

Then it just becomes a matter of assuming a comfortable stance to the ball, centering the sweet spot of the clubface as near as possible to the back of the ball, keeping a steady head and executing a simple golf swing.

After ten years of research and thousands of experiments I have been able to design, develop and perfect more than 100 techniques to lock-in a square alignment and an on line swing path of the clubface in order to hit a golf ball straight-as-an-arrow.

The instructions to perform most of these locked-in techniques are addressed in books, DVDS and Special Reports at LockedInGolf.com.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson—all rights reserved

 

 

 

 

       
About gjackson

Gordon Jackson, founder of Locked-in Golf Inc., author of Straight Shooting Golf and 11 other books on golf instruction, and who has written more extensively about golf mechanics then anyone in the history of the sport.